Sign in

Curious about many things, some of which I write about — usually health care, innovation, technology, or public policy. Never stop asking “why” or “why not”!
Credit: Improbable Research

There was a lot going on this week, as there always is, including the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and the beginning of the NFL season, so you may have missed a big event: the announcement of the 31st First Annual Ig Nobel Awards (no, those are not typos).

What’s that you say — you don’t know the Ig Nobel Awards? These annual awards, organized by the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, seek to:

…honor achievements that make people LAUGH, then THINK. …


Tincture may be (mostly) on a hiatus, but we highlight some non-Tincture COVID-19 and other interesting articles that founder Jordan Shlain and editor Kim Bellard thought you should see.

Jordan’s Takeaways

Covid Treatment could save the day. First Participant Dosed in Phase 2/3 Study of Oral Antiviral Candidate in Non-Hospitalized Adults with COVID-19 Who Are at Low Risk of Severe Illness

Kale, not candy. Candy v kale: healthy food comes to US corner stores in fight against ‘retail redlining’

Kim’s Takeaways

So, there. Yes, Gov. DeSantis, Studies Do Show Masks Curb Covid-19 In Schools

We could live with that. Covid-19…


Credit: Vibha Surya/Voices of Youth

In a week where we’ve seen the bungled Afghan withdrawal, had Texas show us its contempt for all sorts of rights, watched wildfires ravage the west and Ida wreak havoc on a third of the country, and, of course, witnessed COVID-19 continue its resurgence, I managed to find an article that depressed me further. Thank you, Aaron Carroll.

Dr. Carroll — pediatrician, long-time contributor to The New York Times, and now Chief Health Officer of I.U. Health — wrote a startling piece in The Atlantic: We’ve Never Protected the Vulnerable.


Tincture may be (mostly) on a hiatus, but we highlight some non-Tincture COVID-19 and other interesting articles that founder Jordan Shlain and editor Kim Bellard thought you should see.

Jordan’s Takeaways

Long COVID update. Risk factors and disease profile of post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK users of the COVID Symptom Study app: a prospective, community-based, nested, case-control study

Brutal. Get vaccinated. On the front lines, here’s what the seven stages of severe COVID-19 look like

Read this — great breakdown. Is Vaccine Immunity Waning?

Kim’s Takeaways

About the need for boosters… What We Actually Know About Waning Immunity

What, us…


Credit: Brainhub

I can’t believe I’ve gone this long without knowing about Gall’s Law (thanks to @niquola for tweeting it!). For those of you similarly unaware, John Gall was a pediatrician who, seemingly in his spare time, wrote Systemantics: How Systems Work and Especially How They Fail in 1975. His “law,” contained therein, is:


Tincture may be (mostly) on a hiatus, but we highlight some non-Tincture COVID-19 and other interesting articles that founder Jordan Shlain and editor Kim Bellard thought you should see.

Jordan’s Takeaways

Bummer. Changes in Body Mass Index Among Children and Adolescents During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Science. COVID Vaccines Show No Signs of Harming Fertility or Sexual Function

Ugh. Rapid Increase in Ivermectin Prescriptions and Reports of Severe Illness Associated with Use of Products Containing Ivermectin to Prevent or Treat COVID-19

Healthcare workers are not commodities — and they have choices, too.


The healthcare world is abuzz with Dr. David Feinberg’s departure from Google Health — another tech giant is shocked to find healthcare was so complicated! — while one of those tech giants (Amazon) not only just surpassed Walmart in consumer spending but also is now planning to build its own department stores. Both very interesting, but all I can think about is robots.

Most of the recent publicity about robots has come from Elon Musk’s announcement of the Tesla Bot, or the new video of Boston Dynamic’s Atlas doing more amazing acrobatics, but I was more intrigued by Brooks Barnes’s…


Tincture may be (mostly) on a hiatus, but we highlight some non-Tincture COVID-19 and other interesting articles that founder Jordan Shlain and editor Kim Bellard thought you should see.

Jordan’s Takeaways

This is a good read for the geeks who want to understand why the media is all tied up in a Gordian knot over the Israeli data. Israeli data: How can efficacy vs. severe disease be strong when 60% of hospitalized are vaccinated?

Parents in a bind. The Deeply Unfair Question Parents Must Answer

Kim’s Takeaways

Evolution at work. Viral evolution 101: Why the coronavirus has changed as it…


Illustration by Ori Toor for The New York Times

The Conversation had a provocative article by Stanford professor Richard White about how America has a bad pattern of wasting infrastructure spending. In light of the surprisingly bipartisan $1 trillion infrastructure bill recently passed by the Senate, this seems like something we should be giving some serious thought to.

I’ll posit that we’re doing it again, by not adequately addressing the potential that our excreta, to be polite, offers to detect health issues, including but not limited to COVID-19.

No shit: excrement can be an important tool in public — and personal — health.


Tincture may be (mostly) on a hiatus, but we highlight some non-Tincture COVID-19 and other interesting articles that founder Jordan Shlain and editor Kim Bellard thought you should see.

Tincture Takeaways

Jordan had hoped to be done with these, but Delta had different ideas. Jordan Shlain, MD: Dispatch #19: Delta Variants — More Science, Less Fiction.

Jordan’s Takeaways

For all the people peddling vaccine mis-information, look what you’re doing to my colleagues. Critical Care Doctors Are in Crisis

Energy expenditure is stable between our twenties and late fifties. METABOLISM CHANGES WITH AGE, JUST NOT WHEN YOU MIGHT THINK

Pregnancy and…

Kim Bellard

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store